T H E   G R E E N L A K E   P A D D L E R
INSTALLING A THROUGH HULL KAYAK RUDDER








OH NO, NOT A RUDDER ... PART ONE

LET'S SEE AND GIVE THE RUDDER A FAIR CHANCE.



The Kirton Meridian I am using at the moment as a kayak sailer just screamed to be
equiped with a rudder. Not because it needs a rudder, it has a retractable skeg
and does excellent with that. The thing is that the Meridian has a very odd
shape, a deep narrow bow, a parabolic mid section and an extremely
shalow rear end. With skeg - Up this boat spins in the wind at once.



The loose rear end makes it " listen'' to a rudder extremely well was my thinking.
So I went about and drilled a few holes, right behind the skeg where I wanted to
mount a section of polyester pipe for the rudder axle to rotate in. To be
sure
the pipe was really firmly connectec to the hull without having to fumble
with resin and fibreglass in a confined space, and to be shock proof
I've used Sikaflex Marine Adhesive and a pair of split golf balls.





An old surfboard fin, hardened stainless steel rod and some
other parts make a very useful kayak rudder.





The meridian is in a somewhat scruffy state to say the least, punching a hole here and
there was not really that painful.  One in the deck and another in the bottom.The
rudder trunk ( pipe ) was cemented in. Split golf balls act as a reinforcement.
Inside the trunk an upper and lower rubber bearing as well as a distancer
are inserted. Now the axle is guided, impact shocks are dampened.





Red in the drawing are the rubber bearings ( automotive fuel hose ).
Blue is the distancer, the split golf balls are cemented to
the hull using Sikaflex marine adhesive.



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